Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a technique in which a small fiber optic camera and instruments are placed into a joint to fully evaluate and treat cartilage injuries, determining the potential need for additional surgery.

Osteochondritis repair and fixation

Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) repair and fixation

Repetitive stress and traumatic injuries to cartilage and bone in children and young adults may result in inflammation of the bone with later cartilage breakdown or traumatic separation. When caught early, some may be treated without surgery. Others may require arthroscopy with drilling or internal fixation of the OCD lesion to allow for healing.

Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI)

For large cartilage defects, with or without bone involvement, MACI procedure uses state-of-the-art cell culture techniques to take cartilage biopsies, and grows them onto collagen membranes that are later implanted into the knee joint to restore area of cartilage damage.

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Osteochondral autograft transplantation

Osteochondral autograft transplantation (OATS)

When there is a small cartilage defect with involvement of underlying bone, this technique is used to take a core of cartilage and bone from another area of the knee and transplant it into the defect. Usually single plugs are used up to 10mm. Post-op, patients will use a brace, are allowed full range of motion, and begin partial weight-bearing. As X-rays show graft integration, progression of weight-bearing is allowed. This technique is best suited for small and uncontained bone defects, or for patients who need to return to work sooner.

Osteochondral allograft

Osteochondral allograft (OCA)

When there is a significant cartilage defect with involvement of underlying bone, this technique is used to take a large piece of cartilage and bone from a cadaver, and transplant it into the defect. Usually single pieces are used, but some defects require multiple plugs, known as “snowman” technique. Post-op, patients will use a brace, are allowed full range of motion, and begin partial weight-bearing. As X-rays show graft integration, progression of weight-bearing is allowed. This technique is best suited for larger or uncontained bone defects, or those with early arthritis.

Ligament stabilization procedures

Ligament-stabilization procedures such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction (MPFL)

Injuries to the ACL, PCL and MPFL can all result in progressive cartilage damage.

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Meniscus surgery

Meniscal surgery

Surgical treatment varies when the meniscus is torn vs. when it is damaged repetitively over time or through a major trauma.

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Microfracture

Microfracture

Most useful in the hip, shoulder, knee and ankle for smaller chondral defects

Realignment and revision procedures

Realignment and revision procedures

Realignment and revision procedures such as tibial tubercle osteotomy, high tibial osteotomy, and distal femoral osteotomy. Some knee injuries require knee realignment and/or revision surgery.

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COVID-19 Update

As the Coronavirus situation remains ever-changing, the safety of our patients and employees remains our top priority.

  • We have returned to normal business hours and are currently seeing patients in our office for ALL orthopaedic medical appointments as well as Physical & Occupational Therapy appointments. 
  • We are still offering Televisits as an option for your care.
  • We want to assure you we are maintaining strict safety guidelines in regard to sanitation of our office and social distancing guidelines as outlined by the MA Dept. of Public Health and the CDC. Please read this updated letter to our patients for further details.

We will continue to provide updates on our website and on our Facebook page. Thank you for your patience, trust and understanding during this challenging time. Be well and stay safe!